The Hex Breaker's Eyes
attached to you, trying to trip you up. I think
it’s a bad luck curse.”
    “Buzz off,
kid,” she says. “Mindee.” She repeats my name as if it’s some kind
of threat that she knows who I am now.
    “I can help. If
you know who might have wanted to curse you, I could maybe break
the spell.”
    She looks at me
like I’m completely nuts. Her face is showing what I can only
describe as disgust. I almost expect her to hit me. “You are such a
freak,” she says. “All you weird goth kids who sit in the hallway
and don’t have any friends, you all have nothing better to do than
dream up fantasies about people who actually matter.”
    “That’s not—” I
try to say something but she’s on a full-blown rant now. I guess I
deserve it, since I did offer to let her vent.
    “You see that
I’m not a fatass and that boys actually like me and I’m on student
council and that I’m going to go to college and get out of this
town and you dream up stupid magical crap to try to make yourself
feel better. ‘Oooh, Dina’s not a cool person who’s going to go on
to a life of success, she’s actually cursed by magic gypsies to
fall down the stairs!’ You even realize how stupid you sound? Get
lost!”
    I want to say
something to her. I want to tell her that I’m trying to help her,
that I don’t know anything about all this magic stuff, that I’m not
goth and not fricking fat . But everything about this girl is
so damned irritating that I can’t even find words. Her tantrum has
completely gutted me. Is that what people see of me? I’m not a girl
with a couple really good friends, I’m a loser who other people say
is fat? I know I’m close to breaking down in front of Dina and I’m
not going to let her see me crack.
    One of her
tentacles is holding onto the cold water tap, making it glow just
like it made her shoe glow, just like it make that binder on the
stairs glow. I could warn her about it, but why bother? I slump,
shrinking my shoulders in, and leave the washroom. As the door
closes behind me, I hear a blast of water hitting the sink, and I
know it’s coming out so fast that it probably sprayed all over
Dina. She shrieks so loud other people in the hallway turn and look
at the washroom door.
    “What
happened?” Tamara asks when I return to our lockers, my face red,
eyes wet. Ryan has joined her, and they’re sitting against the
lockers, snacking on their bagged lunches.
    “I hope the
bitch is soaked,” I say.
    Tam looks
shocked, but also entertained by my angry mood. “What?”
    “She doesn’t
deserve help. She’s awful. No wonder someone hexed her.”
    “What
happened?” she repeats.
    “She yelled at
me. Insulted us, told me I’m a weird fat goth freak.”
    Ryan makes a
face. “You’re not goth. You don’t even wear black.”
    “Not the point,
Ry.” Tam says as she pats him on the knee like he’s a dumb dog.
    “Gotcha. So
what are we going to do?”
    I slump to the
floor beside them. “I’m gonna let the yellow thing make her life
miserable until it fades away. Why should I try to help someone
like that? She deserves to fall on her face a few times.”
    We manage to
eat our lunches in the remaining few minutes of the lunch period,
our investigation closed on the grounds that the victim deserves
it.
     
     
7

    I spent all of
my lunch break still fuming over the things Dina said to me. To
think I tried to help that girl. I should have investigated whether
or not she was a monster beforehand.
    Now in fifth
period, I’m sitting in chemistry class, the last class of the day,
at my lab station with Marlene. I filled her in briefly before
class about my encounter with Dina and how I let the hex make the
faucet spray her with water. Mrs. Cole is using an overhead
projector to show us some equations, but most of the class is using
the darkness as convenient cover to lean on their desks and close
their eyes. Only a few students are doing anything more than
sleeping in the dark.
    There’s

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