The Silver Arrow

The Silver Arrow by Larry Itejere Read Free Book Online

Book: The Silver Arrow by Larry Itejere Read Free Book Online
Authors: Larry Itejere
Tags: Fantasy, Action & Adventure, Magic, series, epic fantasy, kids book
cleansing power of the fruit
caused a silver ring to appear around their pupil, which was more
pronounced at night. This awareness allowed them to be alert, even
in their sleep.
    The nearest town, Bremah, was a
day’s ride.
    “Ashra…my goal is to make it to
Bremah before nightfall,” Iseac said as he rode next to Tremay.
“Please inform your men, then join me.”
    Tremay turned his horse around
and trotted back to his men; when he returned, they picked up their
pace, intent upon reaching Bremah as soon as possible.
    They galloped and trotted
across creeks, miles of meadows, and long spans of forested areas
with narrow and wide trails. The sun rose and was beginning to fall
when the Red City came into view just over the horizon. Tremay
raised his hand to the square, slowing everyone behind him to a
canter.
    Bremah was called the Red City
because the streets were made of red cobblestone, and even some of
the homes were built with the same reddish stone. The wall around
the city was about five stories high and extended as far as the eye
could see. The area around the city wall was an open meadow, making
it hard for intruding forces to come upon the city without being
spotted from miles. It was ruled by Queen Viasen.
    The land, though, had changed
since the last time Iseac remembered being in Bremah. He wondered
for a second if it was his own memories or those of his
predecessors, both slowly becoming indistinguishable.
    The smaller villages and farm
towns farther away from the city were now abandoned. He could
remember not that long ago when the villages were growing, and he
couldn’t help but wonder why they were now abandoned. The people
they rode past seemed more cautious.
    Farmers herded their animals
alongside the packed earth that made up the road to the city. There
were people on mule carts, or pulling handcarts, and less than a
handful were on wagons heading along the long stretch of road into
the city. Guards could be seen on towers around the city wall and
at the eastern gate where they were heading. A light flickered in
the distance, and Tremay knew they were being watched.
    People moved out of their way
as they approached the entrance into the city.
    Two armed men, dressed in
scaled sheets of iron breastplate with the insignia of the crown on
their left breast, stepped out in front of them, bringing everyone
to a halt. They knew who the Ackalans were, but this was protocol.
The man to the right of Tremay spoke.
    “Welcome to Bremah, Ashra,” he
said in his Ma’hian accent. “It is required that a party greater
than eight, as decreed by the Queen, be entered in the books. You
must also declare your exit gate and return to it on your
departure. How many are in your company?”
    “Sixty-six,” Tremay replied,
“and we’ll be leaving at the western gate.”
    “Will any portion of your
company be staying when you leave?”
    “No.”
    “Please wait here,” the guard
ordered.
    As they stood waiting, the
guard walked over to a man sitting in a booth at the corner of the
gate. They spoke briefly, and the man in the booth started writing
something down.
    When the guard returned, he
raised his hand in the air, signaling to the tower guards who were
all watching with their bows drawn and waiting that all was
well.
    Everyone knew the tower guards
were renowned marksmen that some said were Golans.
    “You may enter,” he said,
moving out of the way. The guard returned to his post to resume his
watch.
    The sun was almost below the
horizon as they trotted along the main street inside the city wall,
passing merchant shops that were beginning to close for the day.
Peddlers and hawkers alike were clearing the streets, as most
people began preparing for the night.
    They took their first left by
the Wine-Hoppers Inn, heading west of the city. The part of the
street they were on was noticeably older, just like the buildings
themselves. They passed several other streets with shops already
closed.
    It wasn’t long before

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