Black Scorpion

Black Scorpion by Jon Land Read Free Book Online

Book: Black Scorpion by Jon Land Read Free Book Online
Authors: Jon Land
sent the fish fleeing.
    â€œA unique view of Red Water, Mr. Devereaux,” Melissa said, following his gaze.
    â€œRed Water?”
    â€œWhat we call feeding time for the resort’s great white sharks. The fish scattered because sometimes the refuse of the feeding means Assassino and his friends aren’t far behind.”
    Suddenly the giant great white that drew tens of thousands of visitors to the Seven Sins on his own sped toward the elevator. Devereaux’s breath bottlenecked in his throat, as the huge man-eater carved a thick swath through the water, coming straight for him and the glass before veering off at the very moment he was about to crash into it.
    â€œSome of us actually believe Assassino has a sense of humor,” Melissa told him, smiling, “that he likes playing with people, despite the three sailors who fell overboard during his capture and were killed. Mr. Tiranno spent a fortune on the expedition that took six weeks to catch him and destroyed two boats in the process.”
    Devereaux didn’t ask her to elaborate further. He noticed the pendant, featuring the trademark crest of King Midas World and the Seven Sins, dangling from a chain around Melissa’s neck.
    â€œLovely piece of jewelry,” he raised, when she caught him staring at it.
    â€œAnd part of the uniform,” she said, forcing a smile that told Devereaux his gaze had lingered a bit too long.
    He felt a thunk as the elevator stopped on the fourth underwater level. The elevator’s glass door slid open and Melissa stood aside to allow Devereaux to pass.
    â€œRight this way, sir.”
    *   *   *

    Devereaux’s Daring Sea suite was beyond anything he could imagine, and he counted himself fortunate that his original reservation had been lost.
    Melissa held the door open for him as he entered the suite toting his carry-on bags. It was like stepping into a submarine, albeit an ultra-luxurious one, behind a heavy bulkhead-like door. The far wall was composed entirely of glass that, according to the Web site, comprised three separate layers joined by a special polymer.
    The world beyond in the Daring Sea was rich in all manner of marine life, much of it swimming past for him to view. He’d read about guests lucky enough to win a free stay in one of these suites as part of the casino’s “Spend a weekend with a great white” promotion. The lights in Devereaux’s suite automatically snapped on when he entered. Melissa propped the door open and followed him inside.
    â€œIs this really safe?” Devereaux asked, feeling weak over the need to pose such a question.
    â€œEntirely, sir. And if you ever have a problem…”
    Melissa waved a hand before an invisible sensor and, suddenly, one of the side walls brightened to life, much of it filled out by a wide screen television that was more like something from a movie theater.
    â€œHello, Melissa,” a softly pleasant, female voice greeted.
    â€œHello, Angel. I’d like you to meet our guest Mr. Devereaux.”
    â€œHello, Mr. Devereaux. How may I help make your stay an enjoyable one?”
    Devereaux came up alongside Melissa, fascinated by the rainbow-like prism swirling around the Seven Sins’s famed logo, the computer-generated voice seeming to emanate from within it.
    â€œAngel serves as the resort’s virtual concierge,” Melissa explained.
    â€œThank you, Melissa. Mr. Devereaux, may I call you Edward?”
    Devereaux found himself nodding at the wall. “Yes, Angel.”
    â€œWould you like a reservation in one of our restaurants or a show perhaps, Edward?”
    Melissa looked toward Devereaux, beckoning for him to answer.
    â€œNo thank you, Angel.”
    â€œHow about a seat at one of the gaming tables? You can even play from your room.”
    With that, the screen filled out with a shot of the casino floor, each table having been assigned a superimposed number. The

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